Jellybooks is a martech for book publishers

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Jellybooks is a martech for book publishers

You are listening to the audio track of a YouTube interview. Find all the interviews at YouTube.com/Startupradio

In this interview, Joe talks to Andrew Rhomberg (https://www.linkedin.com/in/arhomberg/) Founder and CEO at Jellybooks (https://www.jellybooks.com/), a startup based in London. The company is a marketing tech startup (martech) for the book publishing industry. Jellybooks has been called a “Goole Analytics for eBooks” by Wired and “Moneyball for publishing” by the New York Times.

“When someone reads 30 to 50 pages they read the whole book”

Jellybooks is a cutting-edge platform for collecting data and insights on book reading. The company offers free eBooks in exchange for the readers reading data. The books are provided free of charge by the Sponsors (either the author or the publisher). All the readers need to do in return is to click a button at the end of each chapter to send Jellybooks their reading data.

This interview is in association with CONTENTshift, the accelerator program of the Association of the German Book Publishers & Booksellers. You can learn more here https://www.contentshift.de/en/. The winners are announced on a live ceremony at the Frankfurt Book Fair each year https://www.buchmesse.de/en. The accelerator program aims to push the boundaries of publishing. We will bring you this year’s winner of CONTENTshift at Thanksgiving (Nov 28th).

“You can ruin a book by it’s cover”

Affiliated Links

  Our Affiliate Partner
Co-Working WeWork
Marketing / SEO / Graphics / Sounds and more Fiverr
Email service? G-Suite
Looking for a bank account for your startup? Have a look at our partner Penta Penta Bank Account
Audible subscription: You can listen to Venture Capital books or entertainment on your way to work with an audible subscription https://amzn.to/2pGzseh

Learn more about our Affiliated Marketing here: https://www.startuprad.io/blog/affiliate-marketing-at-startuprad-io/

 

During the interview Andrew and Joe talk about:

The book, by the late Nobel laureate in literature is called “one hundred years of solitude” by Gabriel García “Gabo” Márquez and is available here (AL) https://amzn.to/336TT1w You can learn more about this amazing author, who invented magic realism, here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gabriel_Garc%C3%ADa_M%C3%A1rquez

You can also learn more about A/B Testing here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A/B_testing

 “The book cover even influences if you recommend a book … I am judged by you what I recommend”

If you like to know what Joe likes, here is a hint: Peter F Hamilton (AL): https://amzn.to/2D3XG4V or here https://amzn.to/37no8ob

The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, 6 Vols. Vol. 1 – 3 (AL) https://amzn.to/2QCHaRn

History

Every year the Frankfurt book fair is also the place where Startuprad.io interviews the finalists and eventual winners of the program. We did this already in the past. Have a look at our interviews from 2018 on our playlist here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUbiCAQc22WsdxEzE7iASbXD4_rAAVQbx

Outlook

During the course of the next few weeks we will publish five interviews with startups (https://www.contentshift.de/en/contentshift/news/who-will-become-the-content-startup-of-the-year/) from the CONTENTshift accelerator from the Frankfurt Book Fair (https://www.buchmesse.de/en), with startups from Germany, Denmark and the UK.

Only the publication of our regular news will interrupt the series. We will end with a very special day at Thanksgiving, where we will publish our News, as well as the interview with the winner of the program.

https://youtu.be/-bRuUIrMVKs

By |2019-11-25T11:34:05+01:00November 26th, 2019|0 Comments

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Jellybooks is a martech for book publishers (Videos)

Jellybooks is a martech for book publishers

The Interview

In this interview, Joe talks to Andrew Rhomberg (https://www.linkedin.com/in/arhomberg/) Founder and CEO at Jellybooks (https://www.jellybooks.com/), a startup based in London. The company is a marketing tech startup (martech) for the book publishing industry. Jellybooks has been called a “Goole Analytics for eBooks” by Wired and “Moneyball for publishing” by the New York Times.

“When someone reads 30 to 50 pages they read the whole book”

The Startup

Jellybooks is a cutting-edge platform for collecting data and insights on book reading. The company offers free eBooks in exchange for the readers reading data. The books are provided free of charge by the Sponsors (either the author or the publisher). All the readers need to do in return is to click a button at the end of each chapter to send Jellybooks their reading data.

CONTENTshift

This interview is in association with CONTENTshift, the accelerator program of the Association of the German Book Publishers & Booksellers. You can learn more here https://www.contentshift.de/en/. The winners are announced on a live ceremony at the Frankfurt Book Fair each year https://www.buchmesse.de/en. The accelerator program aims to push the boundaries of publishing. We will bring you this year’s winner of CONTENTshift at Thanksgiving (Nov 28th).

“You can ruin a book by it’s cover”

Affiliated Links

Our Affiliate Partner
Co-Working WeWork
Marketing / SEO / Graphics / Sounds and more Fiverr
Email service? G-Suite
Looking for a bank account for your startup? Have a look at our partner Penta Penta Bank Account
Audible subscription: You can listen to Venture Capital books or entertainment on your way to work with an audible subscription https://amzn.to/2pGzseh

Learn more about our Affiliated Marketing here: https://www.startuprad.io/blog/affiliate-marketing-at-startuprad-io/

 

During the interview Andrew and Joe talk about:

The book, by the late Nobel laureate in literature is called “one hundred years of solitude” by Gabriel García “Gabo” Márquez and is available here (AL) https://amzn.to/336TT1w You can learn more about this amazing author, who invented magic realism, here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gabriel_Garc%C3%ADa_M%C3%A1rquez

You can also learn more about A/B Testing here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A/B_testing

 “The book cover even influences if you recommend a book … I am judged by you what I recommend”

If you like to know what Joe likes, here is a hint: Peter F Hamilton (AL): https://amzn.to/2D3XG4V or here https://amzn.to/37no8ob

The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, 6 Vols. Vol. 1 – 3 (AL) https://amzn.to/2QCHaRn

History

Every year the Frankfurt book fair is also the place where Startuprad.io interviews the finalists and eventual winners of the program. We did this already in the past. Have a look at our interviews from 2018 on our playlist here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUbiCAQc22WsdxEzE7iASbXD4_rAAVQbx

Outlook

During the course of the next few weeks we will publish five interviews with startups (https://www.contentshift.de/en/contentshift/news/who-will-become-the-content-startup-of-the-year/) from the CONTENTshift accelerator from the Frankfurt Book Fair (https://www.buchmesse.de/en), with startups from Germany, Denmark and the UK.

Only the publication of our regular news will interrupt the series. We will end with a very special day at Thanksgiving, where we will publish our News, as well as the interview with the winner of the program.

Transcript

Introduction: Welcome to startuprad.io, your podcast and YouTube blog covering the German startup scene with news, interviews and live events.

Joe: Hello and welcome everybody. This is Joe from startuprad.io, your startup podcast and Youtube blog from Germany. I’m still at the Frankfurt book fair and I do have another finalist from the content shift accelerator program. Andrew from lovely London. As you guys may be able to see, we have all that London weather just for you.

Andrew: I brought it all with me; nasty gray, rainy, cold and miserable.

Joe: Feels like home, right?

Andrew: Sadly, yes. I was looking forward to the sunshine and warm weather like last year.

Joe: That was lovely. You are here because you are the founder of a startup called Jellybooks.

Andrew: Correct.

Joe: And you participated in the content shift accelerator?

Andrew: Correct.

Joe: Can you give us a little brief wrap up of what you guys are doing and how you ended up in a German accelerator program from the publishers when you’re from London?

Andrew: Yes, we are from London. We are an eight-year-old startup when you are no longer allowed to call yourself a startup.

Joe: You can. On my channel, you can know.

Andrew: No. The publishers asked us, content shift asked us, and I always joke, well in publishing everything takes a lot longer so we should count eight years as only being two years. The majority of our clients, believe it or not, are German publishers. So we work a lot for random house Germany for the various parts of the whole spring groups including Fisher, including Rovell, pastor Luba and similar. UK publishers also make up some of our revenue but are actually the minority, we are London-based but the distributed teams, we have people in Lyon and norm in London.

Joe: For everybody who doesn’t know both cities are in France.

Andrew: Indeed, so we are French actually, but I always like to say we are a European company just to annoy Theresa May. I myself am regionally from Copenhagen, Denmark and we even have publishers who we work with down. The reason for us to participate in CONTENTshift was that we have so many German clients and we historically have done read analytics. So we test book before they appear on the market with 500 to 800 test readers gifting a book that’s published in three to 12 months and see how people read it, how to react to it, and we can predict should this be a lead title for the publisher Schmitz or nor not? Should they have just a marketing budget? Who is the audience? We really do wary product-focused kind of market research for publishers. That’s what we’ve been doing for a few years. This year we launched a new project called the Jellybooks cloud reader, how to read books in the cloud. We launched that in March at the Loyalty book fair with Random House. And as part of that project, we were also interested to develop close relationships with their MVP. That’s a commercial arm of the person as well as with German retailers like [inaudible 03:12].

Joe: So for everybody who doesn’t know the German market, they are book resellers like Barnes noble for example.

Andrew: Or water stones in the UK. So they occupy kind of that niche in the market.

Joe: Physical retail stores.

Andrew: Correct. But also Taleno is part of content shift and that’s the closest equivalent to say a gnocchi ecosystem on ebook ecosystems. So we also have that angle represented into jury and portals do a competition or accelerator because it’s kind of a little bit of both, which can be confusing, well represented. And it was for us to have a dialogue with them around what we’re building now with publishers to integrate them into that platform and that system and that was part of the motivation for us to participate. I think a bit hesitant because the all newest in the German market, therefore we were already past acceleration. There were a new project brand new only six months in the market at the time and so in that context it made sense. They took us into the semifinals and now the finals. It’s been quite fun.

Joe: Well best of luck for tomorrow. They will be the word ceremony but can we get a little bit back to the cloud reading just from the position of a reader, how does it look and what’s actually for you guys behind it?

Andrew: Okay. So for the reader they might see an Instagram post or Facebook post or get an email from the publisher and say here are the great books I have and here are the links and with one link you straight can start weeding about book. Usually much larger samples than average, so up to 50 pages. So really to give you an idea of this upcoming book that comes in amongst like all our classical tools, we monitor how people read. So we are trying to get a sense what resonates with readers. We help publishers with the campaigns. What kind of post pulls people in, how do they react? Do they read it to the convert to buying? It’s really marketing and sales oriented, but above all it’s also for readers to give them a really a better sense of the book. We know out of out of our classical reader analytics research that if someone reads 30 to 50 pages in a book, they will finish the book. That’s about the critical amount of what you read. So here we are really trying to optimize with publishers, how do you do audience generation? How do you build the audience for instead of relying purely on a physical book seller or it will sell all by itself, which is still a radical concept for book publishers that you actually have to go out and find the first 1000 on the first 10,000 readers in market.

Joe: When said like they only read like the first 30 to 50 pages, then they read the whole book. What came to mind was [unintelligible 06:00] Marquez. How’s it called? A century of loneliness?

Andrew: Thousand years of solitude, if I remember correctly.

Joe: Hundreds years of solitude.

Andrew: I make it a thousand years because in publishing everything feels longer.

Joe: It just drags on at the beginning, but then you get hooked.

Andrew: You have to get your beginnings right. People today don’t have the patience that when we have the first iteration of the cloud reader, we still relied on people saying, I want to scroll. I want to paginate. You have both groups of readers but people have no attention these days, especially not with samples, so we changed the whole thing. If you start scrolling, we reconfigured a whole book for you to be a scroller. When you come out of Facebook or Instagram, people are more likely to scroll through book.You learn on a sample on the publisher’s website, you’re more likely to turn the page and we can automatically detect it and have part of the program, we also propose to build an audio version of the cloud reader to listen to our books and we shall detect when you fall asleep listening in on you and then tell you “you left off here.” This is the minute where you need to reconvene from your book. So it’s a different way of how we apply analytics and data collection to create user benefits.

Joe: Basically you enable publishers, audio and book publishers to do AB testing like you doing software.

Andrew: We do that as well. So we do AB testing of covers on books. We also AB test samples with converse and descriptions and see which version works better. We are totally data and analytics driven in an industry that’s not used to using data at all. AB testing is a radical concept for book publishers, but you can ruin a book with a cover. They all say never judge a book by its cover. Everyone judges a book by its cover, but it doesn’t just affect whether you pick a book, what most readers don’t realize and publishers were surprised. The book cover also influences if you recommend the book. And that’s an entirely subconscious behavior. So if I recommend you a book, I’m influenced by the cover of the book because I’m judged by you and what I recommend to you on subconsciously, if I don’t blow the cover, I’m not going to recommend that book to you either. So designing the book covers, it’s not about just how it looks in the bookshop, but if you also want readers to pass it on and books totally dependent in terms of sales on word of mouth and people telling other people about the it. That’s what drives every big success in this market. So we have also tried a lot of research on continuing research to predict which books have higher word of mouth potentials because you can have books people will enjoy, but they don’t want to tell anybody else about it.

Joe: Like 50 shades of grey.

Andrew: They’re literally guilty pleasures except that one they actually all talked about, which is the amazing thing that.

Joe: But I assume just only after some time, right?

Andrew: And I think it was also a mass media phenomenon. Where mass media talked about how everyone was reading it and not everyone wanted to admit to reading it, but you have some genres, the more erotic book becomes the less likely you are going to recommend it to general friend. Also the more gruesome it gets in a thriller horror story, you’re less likely to recommend it. Generally, anything with feelings, women read and men don’t.

Joe: What do men read and women don’t? Is there like a genre?

Andrew: Really hard hitting thrillers. Political thrillers, a little bit more men than women. Science fiction is much more female than people imagine. But if you look very much at heart sofa and space opera, you’re probably a bit more male notice than the female side. On the other hand, even male on male Romance novels are mostly women, not men. So women make up most of the readers in the industry all across the board. I mean the highest percentage of male readers we ever had on a book we tested was a biography or history book on the Wright Brothers, that was really 70% male audience, the beginning of aviation on the history of the Wright Brothers. Very techy books.

Joe: I just realize with my taste in like science fiction and space opera, I’m at the very nerdy end. That’s fine with me though, don’t worry.

Andrew: Audio books are more male than female though.

Joe: I love audio books.

Andrew: That is a genre that pulls more men into books than printed books. Maybe because podcasts are a gateway drug into audiobooks and it wets the appetite for it. But also non-fictional there is no such thing as a male book or woman’s book. One shouldn’t categorize it. We see more influence sometimes by age. Some books appeal older groups, some go younger. We’ve done studies on how your TV and film viewing influences whether you like a book or not. So we once tested a book where the agent told the publishers, this was for game of Thrones fans and game of throne fans only finished a book at a percentage of 30% which is very low, but if you were a Viking or lost kingdom fan, you finished a book, 60-70% completion rate. So the publisher had gotten the positioning completely wrong.

Joe: When you said certain books are just coming with a certain age. For example, every time I see decline in the fall of the Roman empire at someone’s night desk, usually they’re about 55.

Andrew: I haven’t even read the book yet, which tells you I’m not 55. A few more years ago.

Joe: I have the audio book.

Andrew: Of course, a lot of young adults this read by women and read as much, much older than 18 and we showed that to publish how much the audience is much older than my young adult audience. On the other hand, we once had a book, no one over 35 read and it was not explicitly geared to a younger audience but didn’t use so much specific language as used by millennials or modern jogger that older readers couldn’t get into the book and so the language used in the book limited to people under 35 that was not intentional, but that came out of their results, but it was the language in the book that limited the audience to not the content, not the storyline.

Joe: I could actually listen to you for a few more hours but unfortunately you have to run to your next appointment.

Andrew: It’s been a pleasure. Thanks for having me.

Joe: We are linking your LinkedIn profile, your website down here in the show notes as well as content shift. Such a pleasure having you here. Keep in mind, if somebody has a game of Thrones in the bookshelf, only 30% of those people finished the books.

Andrew: I didn’t tell you which book that was we were testing because the publisher would kill me if I said it.

 

Closing: That’s all folks. Find more news, streams, events and interviews at www.startuprad.io Remember sharing is caring

 

By |2020-01-21T17:08:12+01:00November 21st, 2019|blog|0 Comments

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